ANNOUNCEMENT
After a lot of thought, I've decided to take a break from blogging for the foreseeable future. With my little C creeping its way back into my life and possible long term treatment now, I need to take a couple of things off my plate for the time being, and the blog is going to be one of those things. As it is, it felt like it was becoming more of a chore than anything else. I need my reading time to be more enjoyable right now, more of the escape that I really need, and what I don't need is the little voice in the back of my head telling me how many reviews I'm behind and trying to come up with what I need to say about the book.

I simply want to read.

I'll more than likely occasionally post on here what I've been reading, and if there is something that really blows my mind, I'll probably have more to say about it and may write up a proper post, but for right now, things are going to be very quiet around here.

As always, happy reading!
2017 edit
I will continue to blog according to my health and ability, and connecting my posts thru Goodreads, so please be patient if things get quiet around here again this year.

2017 edit #2
I am happy to report that my bone marrow transplant was a success and that I'm feeling more like myself everyday. That said, I'm going to try to start blogging a little more frequently, but please bear with me as I still continue to recover.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

It's Author Season!

I've been lucky enough this week to attend not one, but two!, author events, each hosted by my favorite local Indies.

First up, last night Schuler Books hosted Steve Hamilton for the kick off of his signing tour for the release of his newest Nick Mason book, Exit Strategy. Steve is a very funny man and very humble and I've enjoyed both times that I've gotten to meet him.


Tonight, Nicola's Books hosted Paula Hawkins for the release of her new book, Into the Water. I was lucky enough to meet Paula many moons ago at one of the ALA Mid Winter Conferences in Chicago right after the release of The Girl on the Train and she is just as charming now as she was then.

Next week, there will be back to back signings again at Schuler, for Josh Malerman and his newest, Black Mad Wheel, and then the next night with Jacqueline Carey for Miranda and Caliban.

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

everyone's a aliebn when ur a aliebn too by jomny sun

 photo 080417348601_SX175_SY250_SCLZZZZZZZ__zpsda9e2b77.jpgeveryone's a aliebn when ur a aliebn too
by jomny sun
Published by Harper Perennial • June 27, 2017
304 Pages • ISBN 978-0062569028 • Hardcover

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Book description:
everyone’s a aliebn when ur a aliebn too is the illustrated story of a lonely alien sent to observe Earth, only to meet all sorts of creatures with all sorts of perspectives on life, love, and happiness, all while learning to feel a little better about being an alien – based on the enormously popular Twitter account, @jonnysun.

Here is the unforgettable story of Jomny, a lonely alien who, for the first time ever, finds a home on our planet after learning that earthlings can feel lonely too. Jomny finds friendship in a bear tired of other creatures running away in fear, an egg struggling to decide what to hatch into, an owl working its way to being wise, a tree feeling stuck in one place, a tadpole coming to terms with turning into a frog, a dying ghost, a puppy unable to express itself, and many more.

Through this story of a lost, lonely and confused alien finding friendship, acceptance, and love among the creatures of Earth, we will all learn how to be a little more human. And for all of us earth-bound creatures here on this planet, we can all be reminded that sometimes, it takes an outsider to help us see ourselves for who we truly are.


I have never heard of Jomny Sun, nor his twitter feed, @jonnysun, and after having read everyone's a aliebn when ur a aliebn too, I feel like I've been missing out on something fairly amazing. everyone's a aliebn opens with the alien Jomny being dropped off on Earth, to study the planet and what it means to be an earthling. Never feeling like a part of his people, Jomny at first feels lost on Earth, but as he learns what it means to be an earthling thru his encounters with a varied cast of characters, he actually discovers what it means to be human instead, and begins to finally feel like he has found his place in the universe.

This is one of those rare treats of a book for me that reminds me how you can be fooled by a book, and in a beautiful way. Remarkably told thru the sparsest of illustrations and text, everyone's a aliebn when ur a aliebn too has an emotional impact I was not expecting. The illustrations and text are so basic, I initially thought I was just reading a cute little story about an alien on Earth and his misadventures, but what Jonathan Sun provides is actually a guide to the ups and downs of all human emotion, and it is surprisingly powerful. I enjoyed it so much, that I immediately flipped back to the beginning as soon as I finished it and read the whole thing again. I think this would be a perfect book for anyone who is having a hard time finding their place in the world; if Jomny can do it, any of us can.


I received a print ARC of this book from the publisher for a fair and honest review.

Friday, May 5, 2017

The Girl with the Ghost Machine by Lauren DeStefano

 photo 080417348601_SX175_SY250_SCLZZZZZZZ__zpsda9e2b77.jpgThe Girl with the Ghost Machine
by Lauren DeStefano
Published by Bloomsbury • June 6, 2017
224 Pages • ISBN 978-1681194448 • Hardcover

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To purchase any of the books in this post and help me buy more books, click the links above!
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Book description:
When Emmaline Beaumont's father started building the ghost machine, she didn't expect it to bring her mother back from the dead. But by locking himself in the basement to toil away at his hopes, Monsieur Beaumont has become obsessed with the contraption and neglected the living, and Emmaline is tired of feeling forgotten.

Nothing good has come from building the ghost machine, and Emmaline decides that the only way to bring her father back will be to make the ghost machine work... or destroy it forever.

Emmaline Beaumont's mother has passed away. Unfortunately, Emmaline's father has become fixated with building a machine that will bring Emmaline's mother's ghost back, and in doing so, he himself has forgotten about the living in his obsession with the dead, so in many ways Emmaline has lost both of her parents. The only people she can confide in are twins Gully and Oliver, her best friends in school. Yet for of their understanding and patience, Gully and Oliver are unable to fully understand Emmaline's loss as they have never lost someone so close to them as Emmaline's mother was to her. Her father's machine, however, may actually work, and it is then that Emmaline must decide whether the cost of operating the machine is worth the price paid, and will the twins help her in her decision, regardless of what that decision is?

Lauren DeStefano has created a beautiful and poignant story that I feel would be an important book for anyone to read who has recently (or not so recently) lost someone very close to them. DeStefano has a keen ability to cut to the quick of the emotions of loss and what that can feel like, especially for someone too young to have have lost a loved one. Her characters are not cliché and their feelings are quite real, and the story she has created feels honest and important. That's the best way I can describe it. A fan of her YA series The Chemical Garden Trilogy and The Interment Chronicles, I have not yet read her other two middle grade books, The Curious Tale of the In-Between and The Peculiar Night of the Blue Heart, and I think I'll be needing to rectify that soon.


I received a print ARC of this book from the publisher for a fair and honest review.

Sunday, April 30, 2017

April 2017 Recap


  1. Empress, Book One by Mark Millar, illustrated by Stuart Immonen
  2. Death of X by Charles Soule & Jeff Lemire, illustrated by Aaron Kuder
  3. The Girl with the Ghost Machine by Lauren DeStefano
  4. Ghost Rider/Wolverine/Punisher: Hearts of Darkness by Howard Mackie, illustrated by John Romita, Jr & Ron Garney
  5. Dark Knight III: The Master Race, Book 8 by Frank Miller & Brian Azzarello, illustrated by Andy Kubert
  6. May Sarton to Valerie Knapp: Letters and Poems to a Secret Muse by May Sarton, edited by Mary Chenoweth Stratton
  7. Invincible, Vol 3: Perfect Strangers by Robert Kirkman, illustrated by Cory Walker & Bill Crabtree
  8. Dr. First/Dr. Fourth/Dr. Eleventh/Dr. Twelfth by Adam Hargreaves
  9. Invincible, Vol 4: Head of the Class by Robert Kirkman, illustrated by Ryan Ottley & Bill Crabtree
  10. Invincible, Vol 5: The Facts of Life by Robert Kirkman, illustrated by Ryan Ottley & Bill Crabtree

Top Book of the Month
The Girl with the Ghost Machine by Lauren DeStefano


April 2017
Number of books read: 10
Number of pages: 1,376

Number of books acquired: 37
Number of those books read: 6


First month out of the hospital, and feeling better. Concentration isn't exactly up to par yet, so there will still be an abundance of graphic novels for the time being.


YEAR TOTALS
Number of books read: 30
Number of pages: 4,688

Number of books acquired: 106
Number of those books read: 20

Friday, March 31, 2017

March 2017 Recap


  1. Doctor Who: Choose the Future: Night of the Kraken by Jonathan Green
  2. Fish Girl by David Wiesner & Donna Jo Napoli, illustrated by David Wiesner

Top Book of the Month
Fish Girl by David Wiesner & Donna Jo Napoli, illustrated by David Wiesner


March 2017
Number of books read: 2
Number of pages: 400

Number of books acquired: 10
Number of those books read: 0


This was my month in hospital for the transplant, hence no reading after Fish Girl. Next month will hopefully be better.


YEAR TOTALS
Number of books read: 20
Number of pages: 3,312

Number of books acquired: 69
Number of those books read: 12

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

February 2017 Recap


  1. Invincible, Vol 2: Eight Is Enough by Robert Kirkman, illustrated by Cory Walker, Ryan Ottley, & Bill Crabtree
  2. Modern Masters, Vol 1: Alan Davis by Eric Nolen-Weathington
  3. Forbidden Brides of the Faceless Slaves in the Secret House of the Night of Dread Desire by Neil Gaiman, adapted by Shane Oakley
  4. The Queen of the Night by Alexander Chee, narrated by Lisa Flanagan
  5. Smurfs, Vol 2: The Smurfs and the Magic Flute by Peyo
  6. Civil War II by Brian Michael Bendis, illustrated by David Marquez
  7. Hounded by Kevin Hearne, narrated by Luke Daniels

Top Book of the Month
The Queen of the Night by Alexander Chee, narrated by Lisa Flanagan


February 2017
Number of books read: 7
Number of pages: 1,552

Number of books acquired: 34
Number of those books read: 7


Slow reading month. Getting ready to go into hospital for my transplant, so I'm a little distracted.


YEAR TOTALS
Number of books read: 18
Number of pages: 2,912

Number of books acquired: 59
Number of those books read: 12

Friday, February 10, 2017

The Queen of the Night by Alexander Chee

The Queen of the Night The Queen of the Night by Alexander Chee
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I'm not really sure what to say about Alexander Chee's novel The Queen of the Night other than it is magnificent. A sprawling, epic tale that put me in mind of Arthur Golden's Memoirs of a Geisha, we follow Paris Opera sensation Lilliet Berne as she recounts her life from her humble beginnings as an orphaned American child, who tried to make her way to Europe to the only family she new of after the death of her family and ended up being swept up by one circumstance after another into the spectacle that was the Second French Empire. We follow her life from her time with a traveling circus, to becoming a prostitute in one of Paris' more prestigious whorehouses, to her time as a dresser for Empress Eugénie de Montijo at the Tuileries, until she finally makes her debut at the French Opera. Through this tale, she is trying to discover who might know of her secrets, as each time she took on a new role, she also cast off her old life and name and reinvented herself at each turn, trying to finally free herself from her own past and come into the life that she wants for herself.

Chee seems to have thoroughly researched his setting for Lillet's journey, and his writing is strong and precise. Lilliet's life is quite an adventure, but it never seems to be dull, and I never felt like I was wishing that her tale would hurry along. I listened to the audio version, and Lisa Flanagan's narration is spot on; she truly became the voice of Lilliet for me. The only thing that I added to my own listening of the book that I think could possibly benefit other readers is that I listened to selections of the operas and other musical pieces that are mentioned in the book, to add that next level of enjoyment to the story.

Chee is an extraordinary storyteller and I'll definitely be reading more by him in the future.

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Thursday, February 9, 2017

Forbidden Brides of the Faceless Slaves in the Secret House of the Night of Dread Desire by Neil Gaiman, adapted by Shane Oakley

Forbidden Brides of the Faceless Slaves in the Secret House of the Night of Dread Desire Forbidden Brides of the Faceless Slaves in the Secret House of the Night of Dread Desire by Neil Gaiman
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Basically one long run on joke about all the tropes found in every Gothic tale ever told, this is the weakest of Dark Horse's Gaiman adaptations. I haven't read the original story this was adapted from, so I'm not sure if this is worse/better or if it's Gaiman's story or Oakley's adaptation, but I quickly found myself skimming thru just to get to the end, and when you're reading something only 48 pages long and you start skimming when you're only half way thru...

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Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Modern Masters, Vol 1: Alan Davis by Eric Nolen-Weathington

Modern Masters Volume One: Alan Davis Modern Masters, Vol 1: Alan Davis by Eric Nolen-Weathington
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A nice volume about comic book artist Alan Davis, who has been a favorite of mine since I first encountered his art in Uncanny X-Men back in the late 80s. Including an interview with Davis, the book is also filled with sketches, finished art, previously unseen art, a look at the artists that have influenced Davis over the years, as well as interviews with some of Davis' contemporaries. If you're a fan of the history of comic books and want a firsthand look into the life and influences of Alan Davis, this is the perfect book for you.

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Monday, February 6, 2017

Invincible, Vol 2: Eight Is Enough by Robert Kirkman, illustrated by Cory Walker et al

Invincible, Vol 2: Eight Is Enough Invincible, Vol. 2: Eight Is Enough by Robert Kirkman
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This story continues to impress me; with some great humor, well paced action, and some genuine mystery added in for good measure, this volume is definitely all about later plots. While the first volume, Family Matters, set up the core characters for Invincible, this volume is clearly set up as starting points for future story lines, so while it doesn't actually seem like much happens here, it just makes me want to continue reading so I can see how all these plot threads play out. Cory Walker's art and Bill Crabtree's colors are top notch again; I really like the minimal line art and coloring. The inclusion of different artists working on the introduction of additional characters to the book was a nice touch too, helping each character stand out a little while having the briefest of introductions. On to the third volume!

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Tuesday, January 31, 2017

January 2017 Recap


  1. The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher
  2. Star Wars: Han Solo by Marjorie Liu, illustrated by Mark Brooks
  3. I Hate Fairyland, Vol 2: Fluff My Life by Skottie Young
  4. Naughty Mabel Sees It All by Nathan Lane & Devlin Elliott, illustrated by Dan Krall
  5. Star Wars: Galactic Maps: An Illustrated Atlas of the Star Wars Universe by Emil Fortune, illustrated by Tim McDonagh 
  6. Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier 
  7. Invincible, Vol 1: Family Matters by Robert Kirkman, illustrated by Cory Walker
  8. Angel Catbird, Vol 1 by Margaret Atwood, illustrated by Johnnie Christmas
  9. Dark Knight III: The Master Race, Book 7 by Frank Miller & Brian Azzarello, illsutrated by Andy Kubert
  10. Smurfs, Vol 1: The Purple Smurfs by Peyo
  11. Renato Jones: The One%, Season 1 by Kaare Kyle Andrews

Top Book of the Month
The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher


January 2017
Number of books read: 11
Number of pages: 1,360

Number of books acquired: 25
Number of those books read: 5


I can tell that this is going to be the year of the graphic novel for me, given that of the 11 books I read in January, 9 of those are graphic novels and 1 is a children's picture book. I don't actually have a problem with this right now. With everything going on in my life, I'm reading what I want and I have no guilt about it whatsoever. Top book for the month by far is Carrie Fisher's The Princess Diarist, chronically her time during the filming of the first Star Wars movie. It was bittersweet reading, with her passing just a couple of days before I read the book; I thought it would be good timing for me, but it actually just made me all the more sad for her passing. The biggest disappointment for me was Margaret Atwood's Angel Catbird, her first foray into graphic novels. Weighed down by terrible puns and overused super hero tropes, I'm truly surprised that a writer of her caliber would produce something so lackluster and forgettable.


YEAR TOTALS
Number of books read: 11
Number of pages: 1,360

Number of books acquired: 25
Number of those books read: 5

Monday, January 30, 2017

Renato Jones: The One%, Season 1 by Kaare Kyle Andrews

Renato Jones: The One%, Season 1 Renato Jones: The One%, Season 1 by Kaare Andrews
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Renato Jones was born into privilege, died because of that privilege, and was reborn again through that privilege, and now he spends his time between being one of the ONES, the top 1% wealthiest people in the world, and the Freelancer, making sure that the ONES still know their place in the world. Making definite nods to Frank Miller (I'm not familiar with Andrews work, so I don't know if his artistic and writing styles are usually this influenced by Miller, but it is quite clear in this book), this first volume of Renato Jones is a hyper-stylized, hyper-violent, hyper-sensational free for all that seems eerily prescient of today's political atmosphere. The book is cleverly constructed, with fake ads throughout that mock the ridiculous over the top nature of the super rich in the book. Personally, I'm thoroughly intrigued to see where Andrews is going to take this series so will be following along for sure.

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Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Smurfs, Vol 1: The Purple Smurfs by Peyo

The Purple Smurfs The Purple Smurfs by Peyo
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A fun little nostalgic read for me. As a kid, I loved the cartoon and had a respectable number of the Smurf PVC figures, so when I discovered that Papercutz has been reprinting the original comics, I thought I'd pick up the first volume and have a nice little walk down memory lane. Coming at these stories as an adult, however, some things that I noticed beyond the "cute" factor: Papa Smurf is kind of an ass in these early stories, demanding that the other Smurfs in the village do his bidding at every turn, without question; the purple Smurfs may have been my earliest (altho unknown at the time) experience with zombies - the fact that the regular Smurfs aren't infected until they are bitten and then they in turn become "evil" purple Smurfs is definitely a reflection of the modern idea of the zombie; holy crap they use the word "smurf" a lot in the dialogue in these stories, almost to the point of being obnoxious. I actually found that I still enjoyed the stories, so I'm sure I'll be picking up some more of the volumes as I find them.

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Dark Knight III: The Master Race, Book 7 by Frank Miller & Brian Azzarello, illustrated by Andy Kubert

Dark Knight III: The Master Race #7 Collector's Edition Dark Knight III: The Master Race #7 Collector's Edition by Frank Miller
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This continues to be a solid story for me. I do wish that each issue was a little longer, but the overall reach of the story has been a good one. It's been a slow build getting to this point, and I'm really hoping that the coming confrontation is going to be a good payoff. I've also enjoyed the small backup stories that reveal where the other heroes are right now. I'm expecting this to all come together fairly well.

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Friday, January 20, 2017

Angel Catbird, Vol 1 by Margaret Atwood, illustrated by Johnnie Christmas

Angel Catbird, Volume 1 Angel Catbird, Volume 1 by Margaret Atwood
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

This is an unfortunate disappoint for me. I haven't read much of Atwood, but I'm familiar with her and her significance as an author so I was more than intrigued by the idea of a graphic novel written by her. So, imagine my disappointment in what she gave us: from her rather self-serving foreword, where in the first paragraph she reminds us that she is “an award-winning nice literary old lady” and then goes on to great lengths about her lifelong interest in comics, to the flat story that is nothing but one overused superhero trope and bad pun after another, to the lackluster art (sorry, but Johnnie Christmas' art just didn't save this enough for me), to the interjected facts about the number of cat and bird deaths in Canada, the US, and the UK that occur each year, I was shocked that this got published. I would assume that had anyone other that Margaret Atwood presented this project, it would have been shot down. This is nothing to me but a vanity project and one that I just can't see myself continuing. The only reason I can't give it 1 star is because it is Margaret Atwood, after all, and it seems sacrilegious to do so.

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Thursday, January 19, 2017

Invincible, Vol 1: Family Matters by Robert Kirkman, illustrated by Cory Walker

Invincible, Vol. 1: Family Matters Invincible, Vol. 1: Family Matters by Robert Kirkman
My rating: 4 of 5 stars


This was a reread for me, but it had been awhile since I'd read this and the mood struck me. I enjoyed this just as much this time as I had the first time around. I've tried Kirkman's other works, The Walking Dead, Outcast, and Haunt and they all fell flat for me, and to be honest, I'd forgotten that Kirkman had written this too, so I guess it's just his horror titles that I don't like. I thoroughly enjoy the family dynamic in Invincible, with Markus Grayson and his mom, Deborah, fully embracing knowing his dad, Nolan, is the superhero Omni-Man. When Markus' powers manifest, he decides to join his dad in crime fighting as Invincible. I think I like Deborah most of all, as her matter of fact acceptance of the danger her husband and son face on a daily basis hides the concern she actual feels for her family.

This is a quick introduction to the core and supporting cast, and the actual superhero aspect of the story is really just the backdrop to Markus' family and him discovering his powers and how he is learning to balance them with high school. I really liked the minimal line art and color palette used; it's marks a stark contrast from other superhero books and their hyper detail and layered color effects, which I think is the point. This book is a superhero book, but it's different from the rest. I'll definitely be continuing with this series.

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Thursday, January 12, 2017

Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier

Ghosts Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A cute and somewhat touching story about the bonds between sisters, told with the backdrop of Dia de los Muertos. Catrina and her family has moved to the northern coast of California so that her sister Maya, who has cystic fibrosis, has a better time breathing with the cool salty air off the ocean. Catrina does not like having to have moved away from her friends, but has done so begrudgingly for her sister. When she and Maya discover that there are ghosts in their new town, they are taught about some of the history of Dia de los Muertos and also learn a little about respecting those that have passed. I sometimes think that the explanations around Dia de los Muertos seemed maybe a little too simplistic, but that may just be me. If nothing else, it has made me want to learn a little more about the history and traditions surrounding the day.

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Star Wars: Galactic Maps: An Illustrated Atlas of the Star Wars Universe by Emil Fortune, illustrated by Tim McDonagh

Star Wars Galactic Maps: An Illustrated Atlas of the Star Wars Universe by LucasFilm Book Group
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

If you are a fan of Star Wars, especially of the new interconnected canon, this book is for you. Including a timeline, a who's who of important figures in the Star Wars universe, information on the more important planets in the Star Wars galaxies, and then more detailed maps of the areas of importance on each of these planets, this books has a little bit of everything to help you map out the where/when/who of the new canon. Very informative and artistically detailed, this is an excellent addition to any Star Wars fan's library. I'm hoping that as future movies, books, and cartoons are released, they will release updated editions of this book to include the new locales. A Star Wars geek's dream!

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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Naughty Mabel Sees It All by Nathan Lane & Devlin Elliott, illustrated by Dan Krall

Naughty Mabel Sees It All Naughty Mabel Sees It All by Nathan Lane
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Naughty Mabel makes her return with this second volume, which I found a huge improvement over her first story (Nathan Lane is such a comedy genius, and for him to resort to fart humor, regardless of how funny kids will find it, left me disappointed). This time out, Mabel is seeing things, which makes her inherent naughtiness even worse, and until her parents can figure out why she's seeing things, Mabel continues to wreak havoc. Dan Krall's illustrations are perfect once again, and I'm actually now hoping that we'll be seeing more of Mabel in the future.

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Thursday, January 5, 2017

I Hate Fairyland, Vol 2: Fluff My Life by Skottie Young

I Hate Fairyland, Volume 2: Fluff My Life I Hate Fairyland, Volume 2: Fluff My Life by Skottie Young
My rating: 3 of 5 stars


Picking up directly where the first volume leaves off, this volume of I Hate Fairyland, with Gert now Queen of Fairyland, and that goes about as well as you'd expect. She is eventually ousted from the throne and continues her search for a way home, dragging the unfortunate Larry along the way.

While Scottie Young's writing is still funny and his art is as madcap as ever (and Jean-Francois Beaulieu's eye-popping colors are eye-popping!), this volume was far more episodic than the previous story arc, with each issue more or less playing out the same scenario each time: Gert finds a "new" way home each issue, which of course turns out not to be a way home and then she fights her way out of the situation in the usual bloodbath, end of issue. The final issue of the collection does offer an interesting post-apocalyptic view of Fairyland, but it's actually not made clear whether the series is continuing after this volume (which there will be after a short break until the monthly series picks back up again in March), so the casual reader may be confused about whether this is actually the close of the series.

I'll be picking up the next collection of the series for sure, regardless of the slight disappointment that came with this issue, because I Hate Fairyland is still one of the most original comics that I've read in a long time.

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Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Star Wars: Han Solo by Marjorie Liu, illustrated by Mark Brooks

Han Solo Han Solo by Marjorie M. Liu
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I believe this volume takes place shortly after Episode IV: A New Hope.

After deciding to take a break from the Rebellion and go back to being a smuggler, Han Solo is abruptly pulled back into the Rebellion by Leia with a proposal he finds hard to turn down: a chance to race the Dragon Void run, a prestigious racing competition. Of course, Leia has ulterior motives for needing Han, but all he sees is a chance at the prestige of winning this race. The race itself made me feel a little like this was a galactic version of the Hunger Games, as the race's organizers set up specific obstacles for the racers to avoid (not that this is a race to the death, but I just got the impression of that idea). There was also a little more science fiction than I'm used to with Star Wars, with the inclusion of wormholes and other dimensions, but it worked really well here. Marjorie Liu really had a grasp of the characters and handled them quite well; I had no problem hearing Han's and Leia's voices in my head. Mark Brooks' art is fantastic here and I'm hoping that Marvel utilizes him more frequently on the Star Wars titles. Overall, this is a solid addition to the Marvel portion of the Star Wars universe.

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Sunday, January 1, 2017

The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher

The Princess Diarist The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is Carrie Fisher's memoir of her time during the filming of Star Wars Episode IV, including entries from the diaries she kept during that time that she recently discovered. I think this was the first time that Fisher really talked about her relationship with Leia, and what Leia has offered to her over the years. She also talks about her fans, and how much they mean to her and everything about the ending of the book was so much more heartbreaking given the circumstances. I was genuinely surprised by how touching her closing chapters were, in regards to her relationship with Leia and the Star Wars community as a whole.

It was a little surreal reading this so soon after both her death and her mother's, as she talks frequently about her mother in the book, as well as mentioning a couple of times, in an offhand manner, how she would like to be remembered for certain events. Perhaps it was too soon for me after her death. Not that I was ever necessarily a huge Carrie Fisher fan, but I've certainly been a Star Wars fan my whole life (I saw the original Star Wars when it was released - I was 3), so while there was never necessarily a Carrie Fisher in a my life, there has always been a Princess Leia, and it seemed to hit home a little for me. It also made me unreasonably angry that Carrie Fisher died; in a year of so many celebrity deaths, it seemed like just another death to some, but it made me angry because she overcame so much, and still had so much to do and offer to the world. So, yeah - maybe I should have put a little time in between her death and reading this book, knowing it was her last, but it seemed like the thing to do at the time. It is typically funny in that Carrie Fisher way, but equally sad given the circumstances. I fairly certain, however, that again, in that typically funny Carrie Fisher way, she would have found some way to turn her death into an appropriate epilogue to this book.

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